What’s To Eat? Bread For A Year!

As I was writing yesterday’s post, I realized it might be a good idea to start showing some recipes based on a year’s calculations… thereby making it a whole lot easier to figure out how much of each ingredient you need to have on hand for a year supply. So let’s start with bread, since it is a basic food storage staple.

{Note: I will base this off of my favorite bread recipe, found HERE.}

One Loaf For Every Day

To have one loaf of bread every day (which means you would actually make it every other day– or 183 times in a year– seeing as the recipe makes two loaves of bread) you would need the following quantities of ingredients:

  • 503¼ cups of water (32 gallons)
  • 61 cups of olive oil (4 gallons)
  • 61 cups of honey (4 gallons)
  • 366 Tablespoons brown sugar (1,098 teaspoons, or 5 (2 lb) bags)
  • 183 Tablespoons sea salt (549 teaspoons, or 4.5 (26 oz) containers of salt)
  • 549 Tablespoons vital wheat gluten (34.5 cups, or 7 of Bob’s Red Mill (22 oz) pkgs)
  • 366 Tablespoons dough enhancer (optional ingredient) (23 cups, or 12 (1 lb) cans)
  • 1281 cups of whole wheat flour (9 (45 lb) buckets of wheat berries, or 72 (#10) cans)*
  • 366 Tablespoons active dry yeast (30 (4 oz) jars, or 8 (1 lb) pkgs instant yeast, i.e. SAF or Fleischmann’s)

4 Loaves Per Week

If one loaf a day is a bit much for your household, four loaves per week may be a better fit. (This is the amount I shoot for with my family of four.) This would mean you are making the above mentioned recipe twice each week, or 104 times in a year. Here are the amounts of ingredients to have on hand for that…

  • 286 cups water (18 gallons)
  • 35 cups of olive oil (2.2 gallons)
  • 35 cups of honey (2.2 gallons)
  • 208 Tablespoons brown sugar (624 teaspoons, or 3 (2 lb) bags)
  • 104 Tablespoons sea salt (312 teaspoons, or 3 (26 oz) containers of salt)
  • 312 Tablespoons vital wheat gluten (19.5 cups, or 4 of Bob’s Red Mill (22 oz) pkgs)
  • 208 Tablespoons dough enhancer (optional ingredient) (13 cups, or 7 (1 lb) cans)
  • 728 cups of whole wheat flour (5 (45 lb) buckets of wheat berries, or 40 (#10) cans)*
  • 208 Tablespoons active dry yeast (17.5 (4 oz) jars, or 4.5 (1 lb) pkgs instant yeast, i.e. SAF or Fleischmann’s)

2 Loaves Per Week

Okay, and if you’ve got just yourself or you and a spouse at home, 2 loaves of bread each week is probably plenty. Just remember… we’re not talking about how much you eat right now because right now you still have access to all sorts of food from the store. But when this is all we’ve got, you’ll be happy to have those 2 loaves to get you through your lunch time meals. 🙂 So here are the ingredients for that (it’s just half of the 4 loaves per week)…

  • 143 cups of water (9 gallons)
  • 17.5 cups of olive oil (1 gallon)
  • 17.5 cups of honey (1 gallon)
  • 104 Tablespoons of brown sugar (312 teaspoons, or 3 lbs)
  • 52 Tablespoons of sea salt (156 teaspoons, or 1.5 (26 oz) containers of salt)
  • 156 Tablespoons of vital wheat gluten (10 cups, or 2 of Bob’s Red Mill (22 oz) pkgs)
  • 104 Tablespoons of dough enhancer (optional ingredient) (6.5 cups, or 3.5 (1 lb) cans)
  • 364 cups of whole wheat flour (2.5 (45 lb) buckets of wheat berries, or 20 (#10) cans)*
  • 104 Tablespoons active dry yeast (9 (4 oz) jars, or 2.5 (1 lb) pkgs instant yeast, i.e. SAF or Fleischmann’s)

{*Important Note: The original wheat amounts listed for the (45 lb) buckets of wheat berries and #10 cans was incorrect. As of 7/28/11 the amounts have been corrected. Also remember, this is the wheat BERRIES, not wheat FLOUR… so make sure you have a way to grind your wheat into flour!}

Now, one last thing to remember. Not all of these ingredients have an ultra long shelf life like our wheat does. Some of them need to be used up within a decent time frame. The ones that will last super long are the wheat, honey, salt, sugar (depending on how you store it), and yeast even has a pretty long shelf life (especially if you keep it in the freezer… it will pretty much last decades). However, your olive oil, wheat gluten and dough enhancer will not keep forever. They should last several years without a problem, but just remember to keep an eye on them while they’re sitting on your shelf because unless you’re actually making this much bread right now, you might start to have ingredients going bad. So don’t forget to use and rotate!

And on that note, if you haven’t already tried making homemade bread… do it! Not that you have to ONLY eat homemade bread (I’m trying to do about half and half right now), but you don’t want to wait until you HAVE to make it and stress yourself out even further in an emergency situation by trying to figure out the intricacies of dough. You want to be well acquainted and comfortable with the bread making process by the time any NEED rolls around.

Alright! Well! I hope that was helpful to someone or anyone! Good luck, and I’ll be sure to do this again sometime with another food storage staple. 🙂

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4 thoughts on “What’s To Eat? Bread For A Year!

  1. Gabriel says:

    Here are some differences, acltluay whole wheat bread is nutritionally better than white and regular wheat.-100% whole wheat/whole grain breads have more fiber than white bread-White bread uses bleached flour and wheat does not.-The flour for both is made from wheat berries, which have three nutrient-rich parts: the bran (the outer layers), the germ (the innermost area) and the endosperm (the starchy part in between). Whole wheat is processed to include all three nutritious parts, but white flour uses only the endosperm. When put head-to-head with whole wheat bread, white is a nutritional lightweight. Whole wheat is much higher in fiber, vitamins B6 and E, magnesium, zinc, folic acid and chromium.-Simply switching from white to whole wheat bread can lower heart disease risk by 20 percent, according to research from the University of Washington reported in the April 2, 2003issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. Read here for more:

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